Zoological Shop

Panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca  china  giant panda panda bear zoological shop wild animals wildlife African animals bears are fun bears of the world stamps zoology biology wildlife conservation carnivora sloth folivora gorilla bamboo

If you enjoy watching, photographing, studying, or just being around animals you have come to the right place. If you are looking for a gift for someone who enjoys watching, photographing, studying, or just being around animals you have come to the right place. At the Zoological Shop we are all about the animals and all about offering interesting products for the people who like the animals. We offer unique gifts for all your animal-lover, friends and we try to make your visit to the Zoological Shop a fun and enjoyable experience, even if you just want to browse the site and learn a little bit about animals.
 

The panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is native to a few mountain ranges in south central China, mainly in the Sichuan province. While a member of the order Carnivora, the Panda is primarily a vegetarian and eats the leaves of one or more of the 25 species of bamboo found in its range. Similar to the gorillas (Genus Gorilla) and sloths (suborder Folivora), pandas have a sedentary lifestyle and related low metabolic rate that allows them to subsist on a food source of relatively low nutritional value; in the panda’s case this is bamboo. With only a few thousand of these beautiful animals remaining on this planet, the panda has been classified as an endangered species.lion Panthera leo Zoological Shop  predators hyena leopard cheetah African hunting dog crocodile gorilla Sable antelope national park carnivora India Gir Forest National Park Asiatic lion Pleistocene Africa

The lion (Panthera leo) is often called the African Lion. This is because wild populations of lions are almost exclusively found in sub-Saharan Africa. Currently, there is only one wild population of lions outside of Africa, a small remnant population of fewer than 500 lions which exists in India’s Gir Forest National Park. However, until the late Pleistocene (approximately 10,000 years ago) the lion was also found across much of Eurasia, from Western Europe to India, and even in both Americas, ranging from the Canada in the north to Peru in the south. During these prehistoric times, lions were the most widely distributed large predator on land, after human beings. However, in recent history the lion’s range has been severely diminished. Even in Africa, both the lion’s range and population size has continued to show major decreases during the last several decades.

Sable Antelope Hippotragus niger  Zoological Shop  predators hyena leopard cheetah African hunting dog crocodile gorilla Sable antelope national park India Gir Forest National Park Asiatic lion Pleistocene Africa

Sable antelope (Hippotragus niger) live in the southern savanna woodlands and grassland of Africa. With scimitar-shaped horns reaching nearly five feet long, adult sable antelope can be formidable fighters and rarely fall prey to lions, unless already sick or injured. However, young sable antelope are regularly preyed upon by lions, and other predators including hyenas(family Hyaenidae), leopards(Panthera pardus), cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), African wild dogs(Lycaon pictus) and Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus). Adult Sable antelope are prized trophies for big-game hunters and humans are the only real threat an adult sable antelope.

National parks where the sable antelope can be viewed include the following:

Rueda National Park – Tanzania

Kafue National Park – Zambia

Mweru-Wantipa National Park – Zambia

Hwange National Park – Zimbabwe

Zam­bezi National Park – Zimbabwe

Kazuma Pan National Park – Zimbabwe

Kruger Na­tional Park – South Africa

Zoological Shop  predators hyena leopard cheetah African hunting dog crocodile gorilla Sable antelope national park hyenas (family Hyaenidae), leopard (Panthera pardus), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) and Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus)

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